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Theology Crawl is Starting This Week!

Theology Crawl is Starting This Week!

This week, we are starting our annual Theology Crawl. For eight weeks, we’ll pick a different location and a different theological topic to discuss while we enjoy a drink. This summer we are going to be investigating what this idea of being “biblical” even means. This week, we’ll kick off the festivities by talking about the Bible’s origins. We’ll talk about how the Bible came to exist in its current textual form, and then promptly talk about it why that matters (if it does at all). So, if you want to learn about the Bible or just argue with people, then don’t miss this week!

 

This year, we are running two crawls, one south of the Charles on Tuesday nights and one north of the Charles on Wednesday nights.  If you look on our calendar on the website, you can find out more information on where we’ll be and what we’ll be discussing from week to week.  We hope to see you there!


Also, be sure to follow us on Facebook to RSVP to the event so we know to expect you. 

 

Matt Chin

Executive Pastor

5th Sunday Serve Day Details

5th Sunday Serve Day Details

We want to remind you that 5th Sunday is coming up at REUNION on Sunday, June 30th. Here at REUNION, we have a tradition that any month that has five Sundays in it, we use the Fifth Sunday as an opportunity to serve our community.

 

All three of our locations will be participating. We’re excited to serve our community and partner with some great causes in our city. Everyone will still be meeting at 10:30am at our usual locations!  After a few songs and sharing communion together, we’ll move into our 5th Sunday rhythm of serving our community, by working on a couple large projects.

Below are the details about the projects we’ll be working on in each location: 

 

Somerville

  • The first project is with our partner Community Cooks. We are going to write Thank You notes, on behalf of Community Cooks, to all of the organizations that they partner with, cooking teams, and donors. In all, we should have around 200 notes to write.
  • The second project will be to help out Reunion Kids and Reunion arts by cleaning out the closet. Our storage closet is long overdue for a clean up, and it makes things difficult for Bailey and Mandy to get things set up. We’ll spend some time sorting through things and throwing things out.
  • We will also be sorting and organizing supplies for games that our DR team will take to play with the kids on their trip in July. This will mainly involve sorting and prepping different supplies. 

 

 South End 

  • We will have a group cleaning up the courtyard and playground. We will provide gloves and trash bags. We’ve also been asked to power wash a few spots on the playground and building. This is an opportunity for the whole family and people of any skill level or age (team lead TBD)
  • To help the school and balet with Spring Cleaning we will clean out the closets on the stage where we store some of our stuff. We will throw out trash and organize/clean everything else. (Team leaders Michelle Fuller and Jessica Nathania)
  • PB&Js for Starlight Ministires. Like Serve Sundays in the past we will make peanut butter and jelly sandwiches for Starlight teams to pass out through their ministry to the homeless in and out city. 
  • The Blackstone teen center desperately needs to be painted. We’ve worked with some of the teens to determine the colors they way and will paint the foyer.  

 Quincy 

 

We’ll be partnering with a couple of organizations and will be asking people donate items.

  • With Fostering Hope, we’ll be putting together blankets for children and sorting clothes and toiletries.
  • We’ll also be writing letters of encouragement to prison inmates with Disciple of Christ Ministry.

 

Here are a list of items that we’ll be collecting for foster families. You can bring these items to our Quincy location on June 30th.

Hygiene Items…
  • baby wipes
  • diaper cream
  • lotion
  • baby shampoo/body wash
  • kid shampoo
  • soap/body wash
  • toothpaste
  • toddler toothpaste
  • floss
  • brush
  • comb
  • deodorant- gender neutral
Clothing(new or gently used)…
+ Girls & Boys Clothing +
sizes Preemie through Kids 16
  • Tops
  • Bottoms
  • Dresses
  • Pajamas
  • Formal Outfits
  • Coats
  • Winter accessories
  • Swimwear
Girls & Boys Shoes +
sizes Baby through Big Kids 6
  • Sneakers
  • Boots
  • Summer Shoes
  • Formal Shoes
Gear…
  • Strollers
  • Car Seats / Boosters
  • Pack – and – Plays
  • High Chairs / Booster Seats
  • Soft Baby Carriers
  • Exersaucers
  • Infant Tubs
  • Bed Rails / Gates
  • Backpacks & Duffle Bags
Matt Chin

Executive Pastor

Discussion Guide: Justice

Discussion Guide: Justice

For the final three weeks of this semester, we’ll be starting a discussion on Christian virtues.  During these weeks, we’ll be asking questions like: What does it mean to be a virtuous person? How does being virtuous relate to following Christ? and How does virtue help me actually live in a modern world like today. On this last week, we’ll be looking at the first of the cardinal virtues: justice.

Icebreaker

What is one of your pet-peeves?

 

Scripture Reading

Micah 6; Matthew 25:31-46

 

Discussion Questions

  1. If someone said something was “cheap justice” what do you think that would mean? Can you think of any examples when justice is technically done, but not fully expressed?

Read Micah 6.

  1. This passage is structured as if God is bringing a lawsuit against the people of Israel. He is arguing that they have broken covenant with Him due to their actions. What injustices is God accusing the people of Israel of committing?
  2. How do you see these injustices at work in your world? How do you see them at work in your life?
    Leader’s Note: It is important to help us read the passage as if it is addressed to us, not someone else. While there are grievous examples of injustice in our world, the accusations of injustice can still apply to us. We often make small unjust decisions or are caught in systems of injustice without acknowledging them
  3. The charges levied by God in Micah 6 have both personal and social dimensions. How are these two aspects of justice related?
  4. As a group, think of a common injustice that people are passionate about rectifying today. What are the common solutions bring to the table? Does the Christian message offer any different lenses for addressing this issue?

Read Micah 6:8.

  1. Verse 8 is often quoted in discussions related to discussion and faith. How do you see the concepts of justice, mercy, and humility at work in this passage?
  2. How is mercy related to justice? Can you think of any examples when these two concepts are related?

Diving Deeper: Justice as a Virtue

Matthew 25:31-46.

  1. Jesus provides this parable as a challenge to people who discuss religion, but do not do the things it requires. How is this a challenge to conceptions of justice that do not require personal action?
  2. How do you see Jesus as a representation of the kind of justice described in this passage?
  3. How is justice a virtue? Why is it important to think of justice as both a civic and a personal matter?
  4. What are some areas of injustice in which you need to personally engage? What would this look like in terms of personal cultivation? What would this look like in terms of social engagement?

Helpful Resources

The Character of Virtue: Letters to a Godson by Stanley Hauerwas

The Reunion Team

Discussion Guide: Faith & Hope

Discussion Guide: Faith & Hope

For the final three weeks of this semester, we’ll be starting a discussion on Christian virtues.  During these weeks, we’ll be asking questions like: What does it mean to be a virtuous person? How does being virtuous relate to following Christ? and How does virtue help me actually live in a modern world like today. This week, we’ll be looking at the second and third theological virtues: faith and hope. 

Icebreaker

What is a life goal that you have for the future? Why do you want that? (e.g. buy a house, go skydiving, learn a new language, etc.)

Scripture Reading

Hebrews 11

Discussion Questions

Read HEBREWS 11:1.

  1. This is a very dense theological sentence. In your own words, how would you define faith and hope as described in this verse?
  2. How are faith and hope related to each other?

Read HEBREWS 11:2-31

  1. How are the actions of these people a representation of faith?
  2. What challenges did these people face that made having faith in God a challenge?
  3. This weeks sermons talked about the temptation of despair. Do you think this is a common feeling for people? How do you think most people deal with the feeling of despair?
  4. What circumstances in your life or the world tempt you to despair? What would Christian faith and hope look like in the face of that despair?

Read HEBREWS 11:2-31

  1. The passage ends with saying none of the people “received what had been promised.” How does this connect faith to the concept of hope?
  2. This passage ends by saying that “God had planned something better for us,” and that this would perfect the faith of the people discussed earlier. What is this “better thing” and how can it help us live lives of faith and hope?

Diving Deeper: FAITH AND HOPE AS VIRTUES

Writing about the experience of hope among enslaved black Americans, James Cone wrote:
“In their encounter with Jesus Christ, black slaves received a “vision from on high” wherein they were given a new knowledge of their personhood, which enabled them to fight for the creation of a world defined by black affirmations. Their hope sprang from the actual presence of Jesus, breaking into their broken existence, and bestowing upon them a foretaste of God’s promised freedom. They could fight against slavery and not give up in despair, because they believed that their earthly struggle was a preparation for the time when they would “cross over Jordan” and “walk in Jerusalem just like John.” They were willing to “bear heavy burdens,” “climb high mountains,” and “stand hard trials,” because they were “trying to get home.” Home was the “not yet,” the other world that was not like this one. Jesus was the divine coming One who would take them to the “bright mansions above.”

    1. Cone talks about hope taking root through the presence of Jesus breaking into the lives of enslaved peoples, have you ever felt this in-breaking presence of Jesus? How did it affect you?
    2. Cone’s description of hope was not passive, but an active on that resisted oppression. How are hope and faith a source of energy for action?
    3. Virtues grow within us and gradually become part of our character. How do you imagine your life would be different if faith and hope were key aspects of your character?

Helpful Resources

The Reunion Team

Discussion Guide: Charity

Discussion Guide: Charity

For the final three weeks of this semester, we’ll be starting a discussion on Christian virtues.  During these weeks, we’ll be asking questions like: What does it mean to be a virtuous person? How does being virtuous relate to following Christ? and How does virtue help me actually live in a modern world like today. This week, we’ll be looking at the first of the theological virtues: charity, also known as caritas, or Christian love.

Icebreaker

What is one of the craziest/silliest things you ever did for love? 

 

Scripture Reading

1 Corinthians 13; John 15:12-13

 

Discussion Questions

  1. What does it meant to love someone/something?

Read 1 Corinthians 13.

  1. In your own words, what is the main message of this passage?
  2. How is the definition of love laid out here different than how our culture often defines love?
  3. Do you see this sort of love exemplified in the Christian community? If yes, where? If no, what do you see instead? 

Read John 15:12-13.

  1. How does Christ’s definition of love relate to the one spelled out above? 
  2. Both of these passages use the Greco-Christian term agape as their word for love. This word was unique in the Greek world. This term was latter translated to Latin as caritas, and is translated into English as charity or Christian love. How is the concept of “Christian love” or “agape love” different from other types of love?
  3. Wow would you describe the relationship between love and actions in these passages? How are they related? How are they distinct?

Diving Deeper: Love As ThE FOUNT OF VIRTUE

Read the following quote by Lisa Fullam:
“Virtues are good habits of character that are conducive to human flourishing, individually and communally, and out of those good habits we tend by and large to do morally right actions, and thereby become better, more virtuous people overall. Vices, by contrast, are traits of character that are harmful to us and to our communities, and they tend to be manifested in wrong acts, by which our character gets worse overall. As we grow in virtue, doing right actions becomes easier and feels more natural to us, because the virtue has become more deeply rooted in our character.”

  1. How do you understand the concept of virtue and vice? Do you think this concept is a helpful way to approach the moral dilemmas of life?
  2. Christian theologians have long talked about love as the “fount” of the other virtues. Thinking back to the discussion of 1 Corinthians 13. Do you agree with this? Why/ why not?
  3. How would a “agape-first” approach to contemporary ethical issues change how we approach them?

Helpful Resources

Love, the Sum of All Virtue by Jonathan Edwards

The Reunion Team

Discussion Guide: Addiction Must Fall

Discussion Guide: Addiction Must Fall

During the first part of the Easter season, we’ll be looking at the story of David and Goliath to understand the power of the resurrection in our lives. Rather than living in fear, complacency, anger, and rejection, God has opened up a new way for us to live in him. Through God, the “goliaths” of our lives no longer have the power over us. On this final week of the series, we’ll look at how God, through Christ, has set us free from addiction.

 

Icebreaker

What food can you not keep in your house because you’ll eat it too quickly?

 

Scripture Reading

1 Samuel 17:4-11; Romans 7:21-25; 1 Corinthians 12:9-10

 

Discussion Questions

Read 1 Samuel 17:4-11.

  1. Why is are the Israelites so afraid of Goliath? What do they know about him, and what do they believe about him?
  2. Addiction is often treated like a insurmountable giant in our culture. What do you know about addiction, and what do you believe about addiction?
    Leader’s Note: This is a good time to help work as a group to separate the facts of addiction from the beliefs about it. 
  3. What do you think are the things people are addicted to most in our culture? Why are these addicting?

Read Romans 7:21-25.

  1. How do you think Paul’s expression in these verses relates to the experience of addiction?
  2. If addiction is so common in our society, why are people so ashamed to talk about it? What drives people to stay in the feedback loop of addiction?
  3. What is Paul’s answer to the feedback loop of addiction? Do you really believe that Christ delivers us from the power of addiction?

Read 1 Corinthians 12:9-10.

  1. What does it mean for Christ’s grace to be “sufficient for [us]” in times of weakness? Have you ever experienced that reality?
  2. How is weakness a strength in the Christian life? How would we live differently if we actually “delight[ed] in weakness”?

Diving Deeper: OPENING UP

When David stepped on the battlefield to face Goliath, he did so without armor, a spear, or a sword. In short, David was vulnerable, but in that vulnerability he made way for God’s redeeming power.

Take some time as a group to share your own experiences with addiction by asking questions like:

  1. How have other people’s addictions affected your own life?
  2. Has addiction played a role in your life? How so?
  3. Have you seen people get free of addiction? How did they do it?

Helpful Resources

Types of Addiction by Addiction-Treatment.com
The Reunion Team

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